On episode 12 of PWTA, we get SUPER JACKED on caffeine and talk the business of cold brew coffee. This super hot industry has been BOOMING the last few years and we analyze 3 of our favorite brands. OWYN, Lucky Jack and High Brew square off in this heart racing episode. 

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Tyler: welcome to products we’re talking about. I’m Tyler, I’m R T today we’re talking baby food. Baby food. Why are we talking baby food?

RT: I don’t know. Um, well we have four babies. Technically kids, four kids. Yeah, they were babies. One of them. Mine’s a baby. I have a two month old. Um, but baby food, it’s typically so boring. Right? Like the, I remember when we had Sawyer and he was just starting to eat this kind of stuff. Like I didn’t really think about, I didn’t want to think about it. You know, I just wanted to make sure he got, you know, good nutrition and, and ate something different every day. Um, which I think maybe we’re failing at now cause we give them chicken nuggets all the time. But I think that’s something that I’m really excited about is there’s so many options that I didn’t even know about and some that have meat in them too. Like, you can totally mix it up and give him a health. Hi. Crazy. Awesome. Yeah.

Tyler:

RT: Yeah. So I’ve got a five year old and when we first started with him, we actually made a lot of his baby food. Right. And now we’ve gotten a 15 month old and uh, you know, we looked at a lot of these different options when we started looking at baby food. So in the last three to four years, the whole market has been flip flopped. Right. Crazy. Yup. Yeah. And there’s just a lot of options and a lot of really cool options. Yeah. So let’s get into it. Let’s do it.

Tyler: So the first one, once upon a farm over here, so Jennifer Gardner’s company [inaudible], um, which has been, it’s been unbelievable to watch because they started 2016, 2015, sorry. Um, they’ve already taken 26 million of funding. They’ve got 53 employees, which is incredible already. Huge distribution. Retail. They’re selling through Amazon. They’re selling ’em on their website, but pretty wild.

RT: Yeah. And I got these at a local grocery store. But I mean it seems like you can get them at target whole foods. I mean, just every major retailer. Yeah. It’s, it’s interesting. They seem to be doing really well.

Tyler: blown up in the, what I love about it is it comes from their farm, right. So the history of this is Jennifer’s uh, right family farm. Um, the majority of these products come from a farm.

RT: Yeah. And it said, uh, the farm is in locust Grove, Oklahoma and is in existence since 1936. So it’s literally the family farm. So that’s, that’s really authentic, really cool. Um, and you know, I feel like a lot of times when a celebrity starts a brand, you don’t have that really authentic stories.

Tyler: And she said that she’s the face of the brand. She’s all over the website. She’s doing a bunch of PR with the company. Um, she’s really, really involved in like the recipe development. It’s really cool to see.

RT: Yeah, I was really impressed. Just digging in even more. Yeah. So next is serenity kids and serenity. It was founded in 2016 and it was, it was founded by a woman named serenity and her partner, Joe, they have, uh, eight employees on LinkedIn according to LinkedIn, so much, much smaller company located in Austin, Texas. And they’ve only had about one and a half million dollars worth of funding. So definitely a smaller company that, that seemed to be a seed round. So definitely more of an early stage venture it seems, but fun fact about them. And they’re the ones, you know, when we started talking about it, they have chicken and salmon and be creating a pouch. Right. It’s, it’s different. But the reason for that, uh, from what I’ve read is it started basically as a paleo coaching company and she was trying to, you know, get people into paleo and educate people about that and that, I mean, I’m sure the story is a lot more interesting than, than I’m gonna make it. But, uh, it turned into a baby food company that is obviously a lot of paleo focused, which I just think is fascinating. I’ve never seen before.

Tyler: Yeah. Well, it’s not going to be cheap to start with these companies, right? Like it’s going to be cheap to start sticking chicken in a packet. You know, like there’s a lot of R D that has to go into. Exactly. You know, so that funding up front, every one of these have taken funding. Um, there’s a reason for it.

RT: Absolutely. And if you want to have distribution in any kind of retail store or have subscription, like the next one, I mean you need to have infrastructure. Yeah.

Tyler: So it’s food, food scary. I mean, you know, even like little spoon, which we’re going to talk about now. I mean they’re making this food and it’s what, 14 day shelf life. So it comes to your house. It’s subscription base, which is a little bit different. So they’re not doing retail 14 day shelf life does allow logistics involved. It’s crazy. Yeah.

RT: They seem to be doing well and they’ve been around longer than the other ones.

Tyler: Yeah. So 2013 a little bit different setups. So subscription only, like I said, newer retail distribution, a founder’s names are Michelle, Ben, Angela, and Lisa was actually four of them. Um, and they have collaborated on this number of employees, about 13, they’re located in New York and they’ve taken about 7 million in funding. Yeah. The most interesting thing is that San Francisco 40 Niners are actually investors in this company. Interesting. Which is wild. I wonder why I had some kind of connection there. Yeah. Connection. Um, the 49 said that basically they just, they’re advocating for a healthier, healthier children and maybe it goes back to like the NFL has pushed for the place, the old 60 minutes kind of thing or whatever, but kind of interesting.

RT: Yeah. Well it’s, I mean, they’re all interesting and, and it’s like you said, it takes a lot of capital to start one of these companies. So, you know, it’s cool to see that other people besides the founders are putting money in because they’re clearly doing something right. Yeah.

Tyler: Okay. So let’s chat a little bit about the overall packaging and design and then we’re going to get into these arrests or eating them. I’m ready. Are you ready? Okay. I’m stoked. I’m going to fire off on one spot of farm. So just overall packaging, once again, this is a retail company, so they’re set up, you know, to go into a target or go into whole foods. So you know, their approach is going to be shelf space, you know, when they’re looking, when they’re on a shelf next to another brand, how do they look? I liked their packaging and I loved the branding behind it. It’s clean concept. And what I love about food is that, you know, they use those colors, the reds, the greens, they show the food kind of in the back little window here, which is cool. Um, they, they really try to translate the healthy, you know, vibe, which I really like and I love the name too, once upon a farm. Yeah, it’s great.

RT: It’s, it’s, it’s clean, it’s clear everything that’s in the package is written on the package. I mean they just, they obviously did a lot of research up front to make sure that all of this works really well and they don’t have too many skews. You know, I think that’s, that’s a, a problem that I’ve seen with a lot of, you know, food brands is they just dive in and they have like 50 different options. Um, I think this, this is all the different ideas or six different options that I found. Maybe seven options. Um, in the, the local grocery store, they found a man and they, they try to do I guess applesauce, right? And then cold pressed smoothie and cold pressed fruits and vegetables. And so those are kind of their three categories. Yeah.

Tyler: The challenge I noticed with those guys is that baby food, you typically go to like the aisle, right? Yeah. So you get all that, you walk up, you’ve got Gerber, all of these brands, well this, you gotta go the refrigerated section, right? Isn’t a secret. That’s the only one in there. Yeah. So that’s something the education has to, Hey, you need to go to whole foods and find it. Right. Versus like, Oh, I’m just going to go and buy some baby food. You’re not going to find it.

RT: And I bet that is probably one of the most expensive parts of their marketing, but it is, okay, we got them into whole foods, but how do we get the product in their hand? Yeah, yeah, yeah. Absolutely.

RT: Yeah, that one’s, that one’s interesting to me just because of their retail strategy, but a serenity kids. I just love how clean and simple the packaging is. Um, this is their chicken one and has a chicken right on the front, right? You have cows on the other one. And um, I mean it’s paleo. Like it’s the rooted, um, it’s rooted in, in the paleo, um, mindset, right? And it says, so, you know, six plus months on this one. So it, it tells you exactly what’s in here. Five simple ingredients, you know, uh, sweet potato, carrot, beet water, and hold oil. That’s it. So,

Tyler: yeah, I like the modern packaging typically on like everything modern packaging kind of guy. I think I like their packaging, but the fact that that food doesn’t resonate with me, I mean, it’s got a picture of a chicken on the front, right? But it’s yellow or it’s red. We’re like, you know, once upon a farm you’ve got this, it just, it kind of screams food at you, right? Yeah. And probably going downside, the serenity.

RT: and these I bought on Amazon and you know, process was very easy. I think, uh, the, the, the ones that include me to are just a little bit more expensive than the ones that include vegetables. Uh, but they come in, in this box and so you get six pouches in a box like that and you know, they’re there. I think there’s different mixed packs that you can grab. And I got just four different options here, but it seems like you can get a wider range of diet just from that one brand and, and mix it up and not just have, and it, to be fair, it’s not just chicken in the pouch, you know, there’s, there’s chicken, uh, peas and carrots, so it’s, it’s still a blend. Um, it just happens to have meat in it, which, uh, fascinates me.

Tyler: It’s cool. It really is. Okay, so a little spoon different, once again, it’s a subscription based, so they’ve got to have a little different packaging. You know, this is going to be set for 14 days shelf stable. Um, they give you the little spoon, which is cool. You know, I liked that little, see what you did there. Little town, little spoon, little tiny green spoon. I like their packaging. I really do. I mean it’s going to stand out. They don’t need to stand out cause they’re not going into retail and they can’t really for awhile. Yeah. I’m being like 14 days shelf stable. But if I got this in the mail every day, it’s perfect. Got a kid, pop that up, boom, boom, boom. Yup. Sealed right here. It’s, you know, what seems like a good portion size. Um, you know, this would fit in really any bag that we have, uh, to take the kids around. So I don’t see, I don’t see any issue with the packaging here at all. Well done. Um, and the, the, the cap actually can be resealed so it seems like you can eat half of it, put it away, as long as it stays refrigerated should be fine. So that’s, it’s really interesting and totally different than the pouch concept.

RT: I’m sure they could have just thrown that pouch pretty well.

Tyler: Yes and no, because I think they probably, in terms of like how they’re making that food, I don’t know what their commissary looks like. So they probably have a fairly large commissary or somewhere they’re making this. Um, but the pouch is nice when you have kids, you know, like you gotta I know this is four more for babies, but like you’re going to go on to feed them where this pouch pouches, once they get about, you know, nine months maybe just handed to they figured it out. Yeah. Yeah.

RT: That’s fair. But uh, pros and cons, right? Yeah. Yeah. All right. So I think we eat things.

Tyler: Yeah, let’s eat them. Okay. So are we gonna just pick our favorites from each one? Yeah. Do you want to start with a little spoon and go with a carrot?

RT: Apple. Ginger. Okay. Well, I didn’t think that was the one that I wanted, but you’re not getting it. Um, who strawberry Bazell beat pear chia. Good fine dude. I just, I went for the color. I’m rich, dark colored. Caesar sealed like crazy. This, hello? I think you’re just weak. I just don’t want to fly everywhere. That’s fine. Get it all over the laptop, you know. So, alright, little spoon.

Tyler: I mean this, this looks like, what’d you have?

RT: Carrot. Apple, ginger, carrot, Apple. Ginger would eat this no matter what. Do you ask second on my packet? So usually obviously it’s great.

Tyler: I mean I might just finish this and.

RT: I had strawberry basil, beat, pear, chia. It’s a lot going on. Definitely tastes a strawberries. Definitely tastes Bazell. It’s still good. It was amazing. Super good.

RT: I feel like this band should be bigger, although I’m a full grown man, so that’s probably why I’m excited to get in my other one.

Tyler: Okay, so little spoon. Really good. I’m just going to add, I’m not going to probably eat the broccoli and spoons. I’m wanting to tell them I’m going to do here. I mean I feel like I have to go the beef or,

RT: yeah, we have to try the meat one. I mean that’s like what I was fascinated by. Okay, so you got beef. I got chicken. Let’s do.

Tyler: beef made with organic kale and sweet potato.

RT: I have chicken with organic peas. [inaudible] today. Yeah. How much protein? They have five grams. Five grams of protein. Oh,

Tyler: I mean it looks the, I mean, so this is where I started to like, you know, second guess I’m doing right now. It looks green and it smells horrible. Right? Yeah.

RT:

RT: Mine’s like this weird. It looks like mustard. It’s interesting.

Tyler: Okay. Like it’s not, it’s nutritionally the best of all these. Yeah. I mean I’ve fed this to my 15 month old and I feel really good about it. This taste wise. It tastes healthy. Yeah.

RT: This tastes really well. It tastes like chicken. It tastes like that. That’s what this did. Chicken and peas. Really. It’s um, I mean we probably shouldn’t have started with little spoon, especially with my kids, man. It all started the sweet stuff.

Tyler: You start with the stuff, you need them to eat first, then you give them the dessert with the fruit. What are you thinking? Yeah. Hey, you know what? Super innovative. I feel like I said, that’s the healthiest of all of them. Am I my world? Because I’m 90% paleo. So like I get it.

RT: for being healthy though. It’s still good. Yeah. Like it’s, I mean it tastes, it tastes like you would imagine ground chicken, peas and carrots would taste like in a pouch. Um, you have to try it. I got through this,

Tyler: I haven’t told you the story. So we had some of this and we took it to a family event, a family dinner and a family member of ours is vegetarian and literally we take this out and we give it to our 15 month old and she about fell off her chair. She goes, you know, there’s, there’s, I think it was the beef one maybe I can’t remember it was, but.

RT: she told her about how the chicken got, you know, crushed into the bag with the pouch. You know, you’re trying and get, what are you doing? You going to put another one? I just,

RT: I just want to try a different one. This one’s a, where’s this cute squash? Wow. Got pumpkin olive oil. I’m just like, yeah, you got.

Tyler: banana swirl. Yeah. I’m going with this.

RT: And like our family, this is just as better. The, the squash. Pumpkin tastes like, it tastes like fall meat. This tastes like fall. God meat. I feel like there should be candles. Um, what’d you grab?

Tyler: This is amazing. This is so good.

RT: Well it has the word smoothie on it, so it’s probably good. This is delicious. So now we’re on once upon a farm. I don’t know. I kind of want it. I mean, is it lame if I just eat the Apple sauce? Probably. Ooh. Green kale and apples. Yup. I’m not joking. This is unbelievable. I had a smoothie last night, so let’s see it. Wow. See if I do this off. So, which one was yours? It was a super food, meaning shot by a.

Tyler: banana swirl. We’re just like a strawberry banana smoothie, you know, ones where it tastes good. Yeah.

RT: Yeah. You stack the deck.

RT: Actually, this is phenomenal to kale and apples. I mean, it just tastes like, here’s the thing, you’re feeding your kid kale but tastes like Apple sauce. So that’s probably the science behind this one or the art. My youngest one. Yeah.

Tyler: So overall, I mean, I think one spot for one was my favorite little spoon. Second, um, serenity is third, but like they’re, they’re different and I really respect what they’re trying to do. I would feed this and feel really good, um, to my, to my 15 month old and.

RT: he runs a nutrition company. So I kind of know what I’m talking, trying to knows what he’s talking about. He didn’t just stay at holiday Inn express last night, but I, yeah, I like them all. I, you know, I agree it, that uh, the serenity kids, it tastes very healthy. It, it’s clearly my amazing ingredients. My only concern with that is that that Sawyer and Westley might not like the taste or they might not be excited to eat it. Um, I think once upon a farm is crushing that as far as like, it tastes like Apple sauce. All these tastes really good. Yeah. From a nutrition standpoint, it’s apples and oranges. Right. And then little spoon. I mean, there’s phenomenal. I think they both have fun eating it. The same concern that, uh, that you said though, is the pouches, just so easy to transport. It’s so easy to just hand to them. I’m afraid that this might turn into a mass, but yeah, I dunno. Maybe we should, uh, give them to the kids and see what happens to happens, you know?

Tyler: And once again, Sandy has like three grams of sugar and you know, with, with all fruit in here, you’ve got 10 grams of sugar. Yeah. Perpetually not up. You know, if you’d give over the course of a week, if you’re giving your kid this twice, you know, that’s going to have three times adds up. Yeah. An extra 30 grams of sugar. [inaudible] well, and like.

RT: you said, you know, we can give him wine and then give them the other, you know, and that, that probably makes sense.

Tyler: Okay. So now we’re going to get into the meat and potatoes. So we’re going to talk about what makes these companies tick. So the first thing we’re gonna do is look at social, social media. Yup. You know, what’s going on? Social media, who’s, who’s rocking it, what’s making them, uh, Excel. So what did you find, like w what was your kind of your takeaway after looking at these three brands?

RT: Well, it seems like once upon a farm they, you know, they’re clearly a retail strategy. So they didn’t have as much of, you know, Facebook advertising presence or social media advertising in general. I only saw one ad and it was basically telling people that you could find it at Costco. Yeah. Um, so their, their entire social strategy seems, seems different and it, it’s any retail company, right? It is very clean, very simple, just posting pictures of products and, and uh, pictures of products in stores. Um, probably trying to solve some of those problems we talked about of like where to find your, you know, which stores you can find it in, all that kind of stuff.

Tyler: So yeah, what stood out to me was like, you got three different companies here in three different stages. So you’ve got once upon a farm who basically has unlimited money, um, they’ve got a ton of clout with the founder. You know, they can go to the social media and just post pretty pictures and just make it look really cool and people are gonna follow it because it’s her company, you know, and they do a really good job. They’ve, they’ve done a good job getting their, their customers involved, but it’s kind of simple, you know, and then you’ve got S a little spoon been around the longest. Um, I think they do the best because they’re definitely still a small company. They’ve got to work for it. You know, they’re trying to educate people on the subscription. They do a good job of getting, I like comedy. I mean, I love comedy and social media, especially when you’re dealing with kids because kids are funny, right? Yeah. As a parent you’re like, it’s, there’s a lot of funny stuff that happens a lot of times. The overarching kind of theme with Parenthood is like, um, is thrown in the towel, you know, and they kind of make fun about doing that kind of stuff. They do a really nice job on social media. They’re my favorite. Yeah.

RT: My favorite ad from them was the baby. In a box, you know, so the, this, the little spoon actually comes in this subscription box, right. And so somebody put their kid in the box, which I thought it was really funny. Um, and there’s food everywhere. So, you know, I, I thought that ad was, was very organic, very, um, like I would stop at that ad and think it was a post, not an advertisement. And.

Tyler: you’ve got serenity, which, you know, there are young company or new company who have a smallest, they’re just trying to get traction right now. So they’re trying a lot of different stuff on social media they’re trying to give away is they’re doing a lot of different things to get people engaged. Um, they do a good job though, right? I mean, for the size of the company and, and how old they are, they’re doing a good job.

RT: Yeah. And they seem to be focused. Most of their ads I saw where a discount paste, you know, so certain percentage off your first order, you know, encouraging you to go to their website. Um, and not probably go to Amazon where I bought it. Uh, sorry. But, uh, you know, it’s interesting and that’s, that’s how they get you in the door, right. Versus once upon a farm, the, they can’t really give you a discount because you have to go to the retail store to buy it. And a little spoon, it wasn’t necessarily a discount, it was like, since it’s a subscription, I think it was added value, um, that they were marketing. So you get an extra $20 worth of food or bonuses or something like that when you sign up for your first subscription.

Tyler: Yeah. And they’re all growing pretty quickly. I mean, once upon a furnace screening at 6,700, uh, per month. And we get that data from social blade, which is a free app you can use on, um, online. So like they’re all growing pretty quick.

RT: Yeah. And maybe that’s from the influence. Maybe it’s from just, they already have 100,000 followers, you know, um, and they have that kind of validation. But, uh, they’re definitely taken off as, as compared.

Tyler: Yeah. Well, once again, they’re in a ton of retail locations, so that branding starts to snowball. Right. People see it in target or whatever, the whole foods, they’re like, I’m gonna fall on the social media. Like it’s there. It’s a really role, I mean, retail’s important for sales, but it’s also important for marketing and just bringing awareness.

RT: One of the things that, that I noticed, I mean that the branding and the marketing is, is clearly focused on moms. And so a couple of the brands were posting like funny memes that you’d probably only get if you were a mom. Yeah. Um, and, and I think that, I mean, they were really targeting their, that demo. Yup. Um, and I think doing a fantastic job.

Tyler: Yeah, absolutely. Okay, so sales and conversion. So we can’t, we looked at their websites, we ran through their websites. Overall, they’re all three great websites. Yeah. They’re all three focused on different things though. You know, once upon a farm, we’re going to get people into the store. You know, they do sell on the website and they actually have subscription. Um, which you don’t have to about subscription. I love it, especially in consumer products. Um, so it’s focused on, it’s pretty Jennifer’s up front, you know, like it’s, it’s, it’s exact video expect very predictable, but very good. Um, in terms of the other ones, I mean, serenity, great website as well. Um, just like.

RT: their packaging that, you know, they use all the same colors. Um, it’s very authentic. They have a video from their founder right on the front page. Um, and it, it seems like they’re focused a lot more on that nutrition education. And I think that’s, that’s what the whole company is rooted in, or at least what it feels like to me. Yeah,

Tyler: little spoon different. Right. So little school, once again, subscription only. So their focus is a funnel. They’re like, we got to get people into the website, we got to get them to get on the subscription. And that is their primary focus. So they have the quiz, which I love too. You know, they have a quiz where you go through and they start asking you questions and that’s how they get you kind of in their funnel. And if you don’t buy, they have your email address and they can start to kind of annoy you and make sure you’re, you know, you’re getting your, you’re coming back and maybe doing a subscription. So completely different focus, but great website, good use of founders to ally Kelly, other founders like friends center.

RT: Yup. And really good use of like HTML five on the home page where you have moving images and you know, uh, almost stop motion. Um, that explains basically how the product works. And then that should be an ad.

Tyler:

RT: I mean, what, there should be a Facebook ad, you know, the one that for sure. Yeah. I mean they’ve got some great images on there on their website that are perfect for Facebook ads. Absolutely. And you know, I, I think the biggest difference that I saw in all these websites was, was little spoon. And that’s because the entire process, like you said, was different. So I think they just have to be different, but I think they’re also executing that difference. I really, well, yeah.

Tyler: And we really dug into the back end of these and actually we looked at their, their traffic website, website traffic, and we estimated conversion rate and we looked at like where the traffic’s coming from and that’s on the social or the scorecard, a sales score card that’s on the page, um, on our website. But just a couple of highlights there. Um, you know, these three websites aren’t getting a lot of traffic, honestly across the board. They’re just not getting a lot of traffic, but, um, they’re not doing some things. So like for instance, none of them were really utilizing email, which I thought was interesting. Right? Yeah. There’s not a lot of email going on. You’re as an eCommerce company, 30% of your revenue should be coming from email.

RT: Yeah. I didn’t get popups on, on any of the, you know, um,

Tyler: I don’t think many of them are actually doing display advertising, so they’re relying more on social, social media. Um, was I, I was actually interested in the fact that they all three ranked pretty well keywords. Right. Um, so in terms of like keywords, they had six, 700 keywords for these younger companies. It’s pretty good. Um, so they had some organic traffic on the website.

RT: Yeah. And, and, and now that you said it, it’s, I think it’s really interesting that they’re not trying to grab your email. I think the, the closest thing to that I saw was a little spoon uses Intercom and I think that popped up, which I love and obviously very effective and I can just type in my email here and start a conversation, which is brilliant. Um, but yeah, I’d you really missing out on that, that, uh, sign up for your newsletter kind of thing. Yeah,

Tyler: because here’s the thing too, like once you choose, so let’s say you go through the quiz or let’s say your Yvonne on their website looking like, just because you don’t buy that day, like they may go to whole foods, that customer may get a whole foods and buy something, but they’re going to keep coming back. And maybe at month number three, you’re gonna child is three months old. You’re going to maybe come back and do this?

RT: Oh, for sure. I mean something like once upon a farm they could set up a dropdown that says, where are you located? And then you get an automated email that says, here’s the three nearest retail stores that have our product in them. Yeah. That could all be automated and very short.

Tyler: Yeah. So that was one surprise. Um, so there are other sales strategies, Amazon, right. So obviously a little smoother going through Amazon cause they’re subscription. Um, but the other two are definitely making a push on Amazon. Um, so the estimated sales number is based on jungle scout, which is the, the uh, plugin we use was, um, once upon a farm about 30,000 a month in sales and the serine kids about 15,000. So pretty, pretty decent.

RT: That’s great. Yeah. I mean, no problems there. It’s good money coming in. And I mean, the, the purchasing experience for serenity kids, that’s where I got it on Amazon was, was really easy. And the recommended products were just the other variety, you know, uh, options that you have. And it was, I guess the only thing I would change about it maybe is to have like a variety pack. Um, or something like that where I can get, you know, a two or three beef, two or three chicken. I’m sure that adds a lot of costs. So that’s probably why they’re not doing that. But, um, it seemed like either they were doing that or they’re thinking about doing that cause there was like a variety option on Amazon they couldn’t purchase. So I just think that, you know, from, from a customer feedback standpoint, I bet other people have that question.

Tyler: Cool. So let’s talk disruptive level. Yeah. So that’s why we do this, you know, so we can find these companies that are wrecking stuff and figure out how we can take that to their own businesses.

RT: So like what makes these disruptive? Well, for me, once upon a farm, the retail distribution strategy, this is not necessarily disruptive in terms of the entire world. Right. And it’s like, okay, what would you think to do when you started? Companies get into as many retailers as you can, but it’s, they’re crushing it. You know, especially compared to these brands, but other brands I’ve seen, I mean, they’re in every retailer I could find. And that’s really exciting for a small company like mine. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Tyler: I agree. Um, serenity, I mean, in terms of what they’re just, they have meat in a pouch. Yeah. That’s the most disruptive thing I’ve seen. It’s unbelievable. So I love that it’s a paleo focus brand. Um, so that’s incredibly disruptive and they’re, they’re doing a good job. Yup.

RT: And they’re clearly focused on nutrition and giving your kids the best thing in a pouch. Yep. And, and I think that is disruptive in itself is just doubling down on that. Yeah.

Tyler: Little spoon. Um, their subscription, you know, I mean, they’re there, it’s fresh as it can be. Zero preservatives, it’s coming to your house, you near get great quality. But I think the most disruptive thing is going to be the fact their subscription is being delivered, fresh food delivered to your house,

RT: and it’s once every two weeks, which I thought was interesting. And I, I bet they did that because that’s the shelf life. Um, but it’s kind of nice. I, in my opinion to only get a delivery every two weeks instead of every week. Yeah. You just less stress, you know, like how often does the package sit on the front porch for a couple of hours. You just, it’s once every two weeks. So those things you just think of a lot less.

Tyler: Yup. So over all three brands, disruptive in their own nature, but all three of them are doing something pretty special in this, in this space. Absolutely. Okay. So moving on, this is uh, this is the highlight, right? This is the beer scorecard. So this is what we do. What we do is everything we’ve talked about, um, we essentially wrap it up here and we each subjectively give our opinions about a certain categories. In the winter of the total is a person, the founder, we want to have the beer with the person. We’re going to track them down and it out. Try to buy him a beer. Yes. Okay. Here we go. So product design and packaging. Who wins?

RT: For me winter, my landslide is serenity kids. It’s just, it’s simple. It’s easy, simple colors. The packaging is just, it just works. Okay.

Tyler: I gave it to one spawn a farm. I love that, the modernness of this, but like the food aspect got me, you know, it just looks so fresh and every day I pick it up, every week we buy that whole foods, pick it up and I’m like, I feel good about it. So the refrigerated section, I feel good about it and that’s fair. Yup.

RT: Next is social strategy for me that was little spoon. I really liked just how they were using those pictures of kids in boxes and you know, really trying to be organic and authentic about their social media strategy and obviously posting pictures from their customers. Yeah, I agree. 100%.

Tyler:

Tyler: A little spoons. My favorite, I wanted to love a once upon a farm. It was just a little too boring for me. Hmm. Yeah. Do predictable. Well, they probably have to play the safeguard and that many retailers don’t make sense.

RT: Um, yeah. Next to sales and conversion, you know, website and all that stuff. For me it was once upon a farm. I think the fact that they’re in so many retailers, I mean when you look at the sales and distribution strategy, that’s the epitome of what you want for a mass market product like this. And I was just really impressed with how fast they’ve gotten into all those retailers and clearly making a fortune doing so.

Tyler: Yeah. Um, I agree. I mean they’re obviously doing the best, you know, across the board. Um, I think the, the com it has the biggest challenge will be little spoon. How to scale. You know, once you, your customer acquisitions cot, it’s tough because you got this customer acquisition costs fairly high. Maybe that kid wants, we, he hits, I don’t know, two years old or 15 months stops eating it. You’ve got to go out and get more customers. Yeah. You know, you can market to existing families with multiple kids, but like how do you scale beyond this? You know, you can’t go into retail, I don’t think, unless you start adding some things to your product. Um, so that’s the probably the biggest challenge right now, I think.

RT: Yeah. And subscription model is great, but it’s not like a gym membership where if you don’t go and you forget about it, it’s, you know, they keep charging your card. It’s like every two weeks another box is going to hit your doorstep. Yup. You’ll cancel it because you, you wasted for you. So they are the biggest hurdle. Um, I think so a disruptive level [inaudible] it takes the cake. For me it was little spoon. I just loved the fact that they are subscription. I love the fact that it’s every two weeks I feel like they’re doing subscription the right way. And that is disruptive in this industry because most people are doing what once upon a farm is doing. And like, like Gerber, they’ve been doing that for years and years and years and I think the subscription really takes the cake on that.

Tyler: Yeah. Serenity is, I gave it to, I mean they have meat in a packet. It’s fair. What did I say? The packet. Right. That’s awesome. Mike. Yeah. So the winner goes the once upon a form by like one point. Yeah. Just barely, I mean pretty close. But you know what that means.

RT: somehow we have to track down Jennifer Garner.

Tyler: Yep. So anybody knows her. We would have a beer with her or whatever she drinks, whatever you be like if she doesn’t drink water, coffee, whatever. Yeah. Drink when everybody drinks water.

RT: Yeah. So we can, we can do that. Yeah. I want to go to the farm.

RT: Yeah. Be awesome. That’d be pretty cool. We’re in Oklahoma, Oklahoma. Yeah. That’d be easy. Road trip. It’d be pretty sweet. Yeah. For us. Yeah. Well, yeah. So if you know Jennifer Garner and you can get us in touch with her, that’s the next person we need to interview. Yeah.

Tyler: And that person’s gonna get something special. They have that person jokes. Oh yeah. Oh yeah. What do my watch?

RT: Uh, sign up for that. Let’s do ho. Is that out there? Yeah, that’s out. You get a tick watch. $2,000 value. Wow. You connect us to Jennifer Garner can enact us. Solidifies. Yeah. It actually happens that you can’t just DMS her Instagram and be like, Hey, founder, that’s make it happen. Okay. Yeah. Cool.

Tyler: Okay. So our takeaways, like what do you take them back towards it?

RT: I the, the process of ordering all of these, I mean, I walked into the retail store, got these, went to Amazon, got these. And when I was on little spoons website, I got hit with the little Intercom thing in the bottom and it messaged me and said, Hey, if you have any questions, just type away. And I had a ton of questions. So I just started hitting him up and then it went to my phone and I could text them and email them. And it all went through that Intercom service. And I know there’s a lot of different, uh, things like Intercom, like messaging and text messaging for eCommerce companies, but there’s just kind of reminded me of like, I feel like it’s a missed opportunity that I’m not doing that for vortex. And I don’t know how many of my customers would actually use that service. And as the owner, if I’m getting all those texts and emails, like, I don’t know if that would be too much. Uh, but they had it figured out and, and the customer service was phenomenal.

Tyler: So that’s what I’m taking away is at least looking into that and what else I can do. That’s interesting. Okay. Um, my take away, I mean I think that uh, the retail strategy is something that, you know, as a sub, I own a supplement company, right? So eventually we’re going into retail. Yeah. Um, but I think the velocity that the retail helps build the brand is what I took away. I mean, if you look at how aggressively they went after retail first and exploded everything else, that’s something very interesting to kind of watch. Crazy. Awesome. Yeah. So that’s my takeaway.

RT: and that’s a wrap for the baby food episode of product’s worth talking about. We hope you enjoyed it and we hope you’ll subscribe to us right here on YouTube and you’ll check us out@productsworthtalkingabout.com on Instagram, Facebook, et cetera. If you have a cool product or idea, make sure you hit us up at products. We’re talking about.com. Fill out that contact form. Let us know, especially if we can eat it and drink it or drink it. We’re definitely in whiskey. Yeah.. Yup. We’re now in how color painters. Sometimes, you know, we are still at a standing desk, so that’s true. But either way, we’ll see you next time. [inaudible]

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Tyler: welcome to products we’re talking about. I’m Tyler, I’m R T today we’re talking baby food. Baby food. Why are we talking baby food?

RT: I don’t know. Um, well we have four babies. Technically kids, four kids. Yeah, they were babies. One of them. Mine’s a baby. I have a two month old. Um, but baby food, it’s typically so boring. Right? Like the, I remember when we had Sawyer and he was just starting to eat this kind of stuff. Like I didn’t really think about, I didn’t want to think about it. You know, I just wanted to make sure he got, you know, good nutrition and, and ate something different every day. Um, which I think maybe we’re failing at now cause we give them chicken nuggets all the time. But I think that’s something that I’m really excited about is there’s so many options that I didn’t even know about and some that have meat in them too. Like, you can totally mix it up and give him a health. Hi. Crazy. Awesome. Yeah.

Tyler:

RT: Yeah. So I’ve got a five year old and when we first started with him, we actually made a lot of his baby food. Right. And now we’ve gotten a 15 month old and uh, you know, we looked at a lot of these different options when we started looking at baby food. So in the last three to four years, the whole market has been flip flopped. Right. Crazy. Yup. Yeah. And there’s just a lot of options and a lot of really cool options. Yeah. So let’s get into it. Let’s do it.

Tyler: So the first one, once upon a farm over here, so Jennifer Gardner’s company [inaudible], um, which has been, it’s been unbelievable to watch because they started 2016, 2015, sorry. Um, they’ve already taken 26 million of funding. They’ve got 53 employees, which is incredible already. Huge distribution. Retail. They’re selling through Amazon. They’re selling ’em on their website, but pretty wild.

RT: Yeah. And I got these at a local grocery store. But I mean it seems like you can get them at target whole foods. I mean, just every major retailer. Yeah. It’s, it’s interesting. They seem to be doing really well.

Tyler: blown up in the, what I love about it is it comes from their farm, right. So the history of this is Jennifer’s uh, right family farm. Um, the majority of these products come from a farm.

RT: Yeah. And it said, uh, the farm is in locust Grove, Oklahoma and is in existence since 1936. So it’s literally the family farm. So that’s, that’s really authentic, really cool. Um, and you know, I feel like a lot of times when a celebrity starts a brand, you don’t have that really authentic stories.

Tyler: And she said that she’s the face of the brand. She’s all over the website. She’s doing a bunch of PR with the company. Um, she’s really, really involved in like the recipe development. It’s really cool to see.

RT: Yeah, I was really impressed. Just digging in even more. Yeah. So next is serenity kids and serenity. It was founded in 2016 and it was, it was founded by a woman named serenity and her partner, Joe, they have, uh, eight employees on LinkedIn according to LinkedIn, so much, much smaller company located in Austin, Texas. And they’ve only had about one and a half million dollars worth of funding. So definitely a smaller company that, that seemed to be a seed round. So definitely more of an early stage venture it seems, but fun fact about them. And they’re the ones, you know, when we started talking about it, they have chicken and salmon and be creating a pouch. Right. It’s, it’s different. But the reason for that, uh, from what I’ve read is it started basically as a paleo coaching company and she was trying to, you know, get people into paleo and educate people about that and that, I mean, I’m sure the story is a lot more interesting than, than I’m gonna make it. But, uh, it turned into a baby food company that is obviously a lot of paleo focused, which I just think is fascinating. I’ve never seen before.

Tyler: Yeah. Well, it’s not going to be cheap to start with these companies, right? Like it’s going to be cheap to start sticking chicken in a packet. You know, like there’s a lot of R D that has to go into. Exactly. You know, so that funding up front, every one of these have taken funding. Um, there’s a reason for it.

RT: Absolutely. And if you want to have distribution in any kind of retail store or have subscription, like the next one, I mean you need to have infrastructure. Yeah.

Tyler: So it’s food, food scary. I mean, you know, even like little spoon, which we’re going to talk about now. I mean they’re making this food and it’s what, 14 day shelf life. So it comes to your house. It’s subscription base, which is a little bit different. So they’re not doing retail 14 day shelf life does allow logistics involved. It’s crazy. Yeah.

RT: They seem to be doing well and they’ve been around longer than the other ones.

Tyler: Yeah. So 2013 a little bit different setups. So subscription only, like I said, newer retail distribution, a founder’s names are Michelle, Ben, Angela, and Lisa was actually four of them. Um, and they have collaborated on this number of employees, about 13, they’re located in New York and they’ve taken about 7 million in funding. Yeah. The most interesting thing is that San Francisco 40 Niners are actually investors in this company. Interesting. Which is wild. I wonder why I had some kind of connection there. Yeah. Connection. Um, the 49 said that basically they just, they’re advocating for a healthier, healthier children and maybe it goes back to like the NFL has pushed for the place, the old 60 minutes kind of thing or whatever, but kind of interesting.

RT: Yeah. Well it’s, I mean, they’re all interesting and, and it’s like you said, it takes a lot of capital to start one of these companies. So, you know, it’s cool to see that other people besides the founders are putting money in because they’re clearly doing something right. Yeah.

Tyler: Okay. So let’s chat a little bit about the overall packaging and design and then we’re going to get into these arrests or eating them. I’m ready. Are you ready? Okay. I’m stoked. I’m going to fire off on one spot of farm. So just overall packaging, once again, this is a retail company, so they’re set up, you know, to go into a target or go into whole foods. So you know, their approach is going to be shelf space, you know, when they’re looking, when they’re on a shelf next to another brand, how do they look? I liked their packaging and I loved the branding behind it. It’s clean concept. And what I love about food is that, you know, they use those colors, the reds, the greens, they show the food kind of in the back little window here, which is cool. Um, they, they really try to translate the healthy, you know, vibe, which I really like and I love the name too, once upon a farm. Yeah, it’s great.

RT: It’s, it’s, it’s clean, it’s clear everything that’s in the package is written on the package. I mean they just, they obviously did a lot of research up front to make sure that all of this works really well and they don’t have too many skews. You know, I think that’s, that’s a, a problem that I’ve seen with a lot of, you know, food brands is they just dive in and they have like 50 different options. Um, I think this, this is all the different ideas or six different options that I found. Maybe seven options. Um, in the, the local grocery store, they found a man and they, they try to do I guess applesauce, right? And then cold pressed smoothie and cold pressed fruits and vegetables. And so those are kind of their three categories. Yeah.

Tyler: The challenge I noticed with those guys is that baby food, you typically go to like the aisle, right? Yeah. So you get all that, you walk up, you’ve got Gerber, all of these brands, well this, you gotta go the refrigerated section, right? Isn’t a secret. That’s the only one in there. Yeah. So that’s something the education has to, Hey, you need to go to whole foods and find it. Right. Versus like, Oh, I’m just going to go and buy some baby food. You’re not going to find it.

RT: And I bet that is probably one of the most expensive parts of their marketing, but it is, okay, we got them into whole foods, but how do we get the product in their hand? Yeah, yeah, yeah. Absolutely.

RT: Yeah, that one’s, that one’s interesting to me just because of their retail strategy, but a serenity kids. I just love how clean and simple the packaging is. Um, this is their chicken one and has a chicken right on the front, right? You have cows on the other one. And um, I mean it’s paleo. Like it’s the rooted, um, it’s rooted in, in the paleo, um, mindset, right? And it says, so, you know, six plus months on this one. So it, it tells you exactly what’s in here. Five simple ingredients, you know, uh, sweet potato, carrot, beet water, and hold oil. That’s it. So,

Tyler: yeah, I like the modern packaging typically on like everything modern packaging kind of guy. I think I like their packaging, but the fact that that food doesn’t resonate with me, I mean, it’s got a picture of a chicken on the front, right? But it’s yellow or it’s red. We’re like, you know, once upon a farm you’ve got this, it just, it kind of screams food at you, right? Yeah. And probably going downside, the serenity.

RT: and these I bought on Amazon and you know, process was very easy. I think, uh, the, the, the ones that include me to are just a little bit more expensive than the ones that include vegetables. Uh, but they come in, in this box and so you get six pouches in a box like that and you know, they’re there. I think there’s different mixed packs that you can grab. And I got just four different options here, but it seems like you can get a wider range of diet just from that one brand and, and mix it up and not just have, and it, to be fair, it’s not just chicken in the pouch, you know, there’s, there’s chicken, uh, peas and carrots, so it’s, it’s still a blend. Um, it just happens to have meat in it, which, uh, fascinates me.

Tyler: It’s cool. It really is. Okay, so a little spoon different, once again, it’s a subscription based, so they’ve got to have a little different packaging. You know, this is going to be set for 14 days shelf stable. Um, they give you the little spoon, which is cool. You know, I liked that little, see what you did there. Little town, little spoon, little tiny green spoon. I like their packaging. I really do. I mean it’s going to stand out. They don’t need to stand out cause they’re not going into retail and they can’t really for awhile. Yeah. I’m being like 14 days shelf stable. But if I got this in the mail every day, it’s perfect. Got a kid, pop that up, boom, boom, boom. Yup. Sealed right here. It’s, you know, what seems like a good portion size. Um, you know, this would fit in really any bag that we have, uh, to take the kids around. So I don’t see, I don’t see any issue with the packaging here at all. Well done. Um, and the, the, the cap actually can be resealed so it seems like you can eat half of it, put it away, as long as it stays refrigerated should be fine. So that’s, it’s really interesting and totally different than the pouch concept.

RT: I’m sure they could have just thrown that pouch pretty well.

Tyler: Yes and no, because I think they probably, in terms of like how they’re making that food, I don’t know what their commissary looks like. So they probably have a fairly large commissary or somewhere they’re making this. Um, but the pouch is nice when you have kids, you know, like you gotta I know this is four more for babies, but like you’re going to go on to feed them where this pouch pouches, once they get about, you know, nine months maybe just handed to they figured it out. Yeah. Yeah.

RT: That’s fair. But uh, pros and cons, right? Yeah. Yeah. All right. So I think we eat things.

Tyler: Yeah, let’s eat them. Okay. So are we gonna just pick our favorites from each one? Yeah. Do you want to start with a little spoon and go with a carrot?

RT: Apple. Ginger. Okay. Well, I didn’t think that was the one that I wanted, but you’re not getting it. Um, who strawberry Bazell beat pear chia. Good fine dude. I just, I went for the color. I’m rich, dark colored. Caesar sealed like crazy. This, hello? I think you’re just weak. I just don’t want to fly everywhere. That’s fine. Get it all over the laptop, you know. So, alright, little spoon.

Tyler: I mean this, this looks like, what’d you have?

RT: Carrot. Apple, ginger, carrot, Apple. Ginger would eat this no matter what. Do you ask second on my packet? So usually obviously it’s great.

Tyler: I mean I might just finish this and.

RT: I had strawberry basil, beat, pear, chia. It’s a lot going on. Definitely tastes a strawberries. Definitely tastes Bazell. It’s still good. It was amazing. Super good.

RT: I feel like this band should be bigger, although I’m a full grown man, so that’s probably why I’m excited to get in my other one.

Tyler: Okay, so little spoon. Really good. I’m just going to add, I’m not going to probably eat the broccoli and spoons. I’m wanting to tell them I’m going to do here. I mean I feel like I have to go the beef or,

RT: yeah, we have to try the meat one. I mean that’s like what I was fascinated by. Okay, so you got beef. I got chicken. Let’s do.

Tyler: beef made with organic kale and sweet potato.

RT: I have chicken with organic peas. [inaudible] today. Yeah. How much protein? They have five grams. Five grams of protein. Oh,

Tyler: I mean it looks the, I mean, so this is where I started to like, you know, second guess I’m doing right now. It looks green and it smells horrible. Right? Yeah.

RT:

RT: Mine’s like this weird. It looks like mustard. It’s interesting.

Tyler: Okay. Like it’s not, it’s nutritionally the best of all these. Yeah. I mean I’ve fed this to my 15 month old and I feel really good about it. This taste wise. It tastes healthy. Yeah.

RT: This tastes really well. It tastes like chicken. It tastes like that. That’s what this did. Chicken and peas. Really. It’s um, I mean we probably shouldn’t have started with little spoon, especially with my kids, man. It all started the sweet stuff.

Tyler: You start with the stuff, you need them to eat first, then you give them the dessert with the fruit. What are you thinking? Yeah. Hey, you know what? Super innovative. I feel like I said, that’s the healthiest of all of them. Am I my world? Because I’m 90% paleo. So like I get it.

RT: for being healthy though. It’s still good. Yeah. Like it’s, I mean it tastes, it tastes like you would imagine ground chicken, peas and carrots would taste like in a pouch. Um, you have to try it. I got through this,

Tyler: I haven’t told you the story. So we had some of this and we took it to a family event, a family dinner and a family member of ours is vegetarian and literally we take this out and we give it to our 15 month old and she about fell off her chair. She goes, you know, there’s, there’s, I think it was the beef one maybe I can’t remember it was, but.

RT: she told her about how the chicken got, you know, crushed into the bag with the pouch. You know, you’re trying and get, what are you doing? You going to put another one? I just,

RT: I just want to try a different one. This one’s a, where’s this cute squash? Wow. Got pumpkin olive oil. I’m just like, yeah, you got.

Tyler: banana swirl. Yeah. I’m going with this.

RT: And like our family, this is just as better. The, the squash. Pumpkin tastes like, it tastes like fall meat. This tastes like fall. God meat. I feel like there should be candles. Um, what’d you grab?

Tyler: This is amazing. This is so good.

RT: Well it has the word smoothie on it, so it’s probably good. This is delicious. So now we’re on once upon a farm. I don’t know. I kind of want it. I mean, is it lame if I just eat the Apple sauce? Probably. Ooh. Green kale and apples. Yup. I’m not joking. This is unbelievable. I had a smoothie last night, so let’s see it. Wow. See if I do this off. So, which one was yours? It was a super food, meaning shot by a.

Tyler: banana swirl. We’re just like a strawberry banana smoothie, you know, ones where it tastes good. Yeah.

RT: Yeah. You stack the deck.

RT: Actually, this is phenomenal to kale and apples. I mean, it just tastes like, here’s the thing, you’re feeding your kid kale but tastes like Apple sauce. So that’s probably the science behind this one or the art. My youngest one. Yeah.

Tyler: So overall, I mean, I think one spot for one was my favorite little spoon. Second, um, serenity is third, but like they’re, they’re different and I really respect what they’re trying to do. I would feed this and feel really good, um, to my, to my 15 month old and.

RT: he runs a nutrition company. So I kind of know what I’m talking, trying to knows what he’s talking about. He didn’t just stay at holiday Inn express last night, but I, yeah, I like them all. I, you know, I agree it, that uh, the serenity kids, it tastes very healthy. It, it’s clearly my amazing ingredients. My only concern with that is that that Sawyer and Westley might not like the taste or they might not be excited to eat it. Um, I think once upon a farm is crushing that as far as like, it tastes like Apple sauce. All these tastes really good. Yeah. From a nutrition standpoint, it’s apples and oranges. Right. And then little spoon. I mean, there’s phenomenal. I think they both have fun eating it. The same concern that, uh, that you said though, is the pouches, just so easy to transport. It’s so easy to just hand to them. I’m afraid that this might turn into a mass, but yeah, I dunno. Maybe we should, uh, give them to the kids and see what happens to happens, you know?

Tyler: And once again, Sandy has like three grams of sugar and you know, with, with all fruit in here, you’ve got 10 grams of sugar. Yeah. Perpetually not up. You know, if you’d give over the course of a week, if you’re giving your kid this twice, you know, that’s going to have three times adds up. Yeah. An extra 30 grams of sugar. [inaudible] well, and like.

RT: you said, you know, we can give him wine and then give them the other, you know, and that, that probably makes sense.

Tyler: Okay. So now we’re going to get into the meat and potatoes. So we’re going to talk about what makes these companies tick. So the first thing we’re gonna do is look at social, social media. Yup. You know, what’s going on? Social media, who’s, who’s rocking it, what’s making them, uh, Excel. So what did you find, like w what was your kind of your takeaway after looking at these three brands?

RT: Well, it seems like once upon a farm they, you know, they’re clearly a retail strategy. So they didn’t have as much of, you know, Facebook advertising presence or social media advertising in general. I only saw one ad and it was basically telling people that you could find it at Costco. Yeah. Um, so their, their entire social strategy seems, seems different and it, it’s any retail company, right? It is very clean, very simple, just posting pictures of products and, and uh, pictures of products in stores. Um, probably trying to solve some of those problems we talked about of like where to find your, you know, which stores you can find it in, all that kind of stuff.

Tyler: So yeah, what stood out to me was like, you got three different companies here in three different stages. So you’ve got once upon a farm who basically has unlimited money, um, they’ve got a ton of clout with the founder. You know, they can go to the social media and just post pretty pictures and just make it look really cool and people are gonna follow it because it’s her company, you know, and they do a really good job. They’ve, they’ve done a good job getting their, their customers involved, but it’s kind of simple, you know, and then you’ve got S a little spoon been around the longest. Um, I think they do the best because they’re definitely still a small company. They’ve got to work for it. You know, they’re trying to educate people on the subscription. They do a good job of getting, I like comedy. I mean, I love comedy and social media, especially when you’re dealing with kids because kids are funny, right? Yeah. As a parent you’re like, it’s, there’s a lot of funny stuff that happens a lot of times. The overarching kind of theme with Parenthood is like, um, is thrown in the towel, you know, and they kind of make fun about doing that kind of stuff. They do a really nice job on social media. They’re my favorite. Yeah.

RT: My favorite ad from them was the baby. In a box, you know, so the, this, the little spoon actually comes in this subscription box, right. And so somebody put their kid in the box, which I thought it was really funny. Um, and there’s food everywhere. So, you know, I, I thought that ad was, was very organic, very, um, like I would stop at that ad and think it was a post, not an advertisement. And.

Tyler: you’ve got serenity, which, you know, there are young company or new company who have a smallest, they’re just trying to get traction right now. So they’re trying a lot of different stuff on social media they’re trying to give away is they’re doing a lot of different things to get people engaged. Um, they do a good job though, right? I mean, for the size of the company and, and how old they are, they’re doing a good job.

RT: Yeah. And they seem to be focused. Most of their ads I saw where a discount paste, you know, so certain percentage off your first order, you know, encouraging you to go to their website. Um, and not probably go to Amazon where I bought it. Uh, sorry. But, uh, you know, it’s interesting and that’s, that’s how they get you in the door, right. Versus once upon a farm, the, they can’t really give you a discount because you have to go to the retail store to buy it. And a little spoon, it wasn’t necessarily a discount, it was like, since it’s a subscription, I think it was added value, um, that they were marketing. So you get an extra $20 worth of food or bonuses or something like that when you sign up for your first subscription.

Tyler: Yeah. And they’re all growing pretty quickly. I mean, once upon a furnace screening at 6,700, uh, per month. And we get that data from social blade, which is a free app you can use on, um, online. So like they’re all growing pretty quick.

RT: Yeah. And maybe that’s from the influence. Maybe it’s from just, they already have 100,000 followers, you know, um, and they have that kind of validation. But, uh, they’re definitely taken off as, as compared.

Tyler: Yeah. Well, once again, they’re in a ton of retail locations, so that branding starts to snowball. Right. People see it in target or whatever, the whole foods, they’re like, I’m gonna fall on the social media. Like it’s there. It’s a really role, I mean, retail’s important for sales, but it’s also important for marketing and just bringing awareness.

RT: One of the things that, that I noticed, I mean that the branding and the marketing is, is clearly focused on moms. And so a couple of the brands were posting like funny memes that you’d probably only get if you were a mom. Yeah. Um, and, and I think that, I mean, they were really targeting their, that demo. Yup. Um, and I think doing a fantastic job.

Tyler: Yeah, absolutely. Okay, so sales and conversion. So we can’t, we looked at their websites, we ran through their websites. Overall, they’re all three great websites. Yeah. They’re all three focused on different things though. You know, once upon a farm, we’re going to get people into the store. You know, they do sell on the website and they actually have subscription. Um, which you don’t have to about subscription. I love it, especially in consumer products. Um, so it’s focused on, it’s pretty Jennifer’s up front, you know, like it’s, it’s, it’s exact video expect very predictable, but very good. Um, in terms of the other ones, I mean, serenity, great website as well. Um, just like.

RT: their packaging that, you know, they use all the same colors. Um, it’s very authentic. They have a video from their founder right on the front page. Um, and it, it seems like they’re focused a lot more on that nutrition education. And I think that’s, that’s what the whole company is rooted in, or at least what it feels like to me. Yeah,

Tyler: little spoon different. Right. So little school, once again, subscription only. So their focus is a funnel. They’re like, we got to get people into the website, we got to get them to get on the subscription. And that is their primary focus. So they have the quiz, which I love too. You know, they have a quiz where you go through and they start asking you questions and that’s how they get you kind of in their funnel. And if you don’t buy, they have your email address and they can start to kind of annoy you and make sure you’re, you know, you’re getting your, you’re coming back and maybe doing a subscription. So completely different focus, but great website, good use of founders to ally Kelly, other founders like friends center.

RT: Yup. And really good use of like HTML five on the home page where you have moving images and you know, uh, almost stop motion. Um, that explains basically how the product works. And then that should be an ad.

Tyler:

RT: I mean, what, there should be a Facebook ad, you know, the one that for sure. Yeah. I mean they’ve got some great images on there on their website that are perfect for Facebook ads. Absolutely. And you know, I, I think the biggest difference that I saw in all these websites was, was little spoon. And that’s because the entire process, like you said, was different. So I think they just have to be different, but I think they’re also executing that difference. I really, well, yeah.

Tyler: And we really dug into the back end of these and actually we looked at their, their traffic website, website traffic, and we estimated conversion rate and we looked at like where the traffic’s coming from and that’s on the social or the scorecard, a sales score card that’s on the page, um, on our website. But just a couple of highlights there. Um, you know, these three websites aren’t getting a lot of traffic, honestly across the board. They’re just not getting a lot of traffic, but, um, they’re not doing some things. So like for instance, none of them were really utilizing email, which I thought was interesting. Right? Yeah. There’s not a lot of email going on. You’re as an eCommerce company, 30% of your revenue should be coming from email.

RT: Yeah. I didn’t get popups on, on any of the, you know, um,

Tyler: I don’t think many of them are actually doing display advertising, so they’re relying more on social, social media. Um, was I, I was actually interested in the fact that they all three ranked pretty well keywords. Right. Um, so in terms of like keywords, they had six, 700 keywords for these younger companies. It’s pretty good. Um, so they had some organic traffic on the website.

RT: Yeah. And, and, and now that you said it, it’s, I think it’s really interesting that they’re not trying to grab your email. I think the, the closest thing to that I saw was a little spoon uses Intercom and I think that popped up, which I love and obviously very effective and I can just type in my email here and start a conversation, which is brilliant. Um, but yeah, I’d you really missing out on that, that, uh, sign up for your newsletter kind of thing. Yeah,

Tyler: because here’s the thing too, like once you choose, so let’s say you go through the quiz or let’s say your Yvonne on their website looking like, just because you don’t buy that day, like they may go to whole foods, that customer may get a whole foods and buy something, but they’re going to keep coming back. And maybe at month number three, you’re gonna child is three months old. You’re going to maybe come back and do this?

RT: Oh, for sure. I mean something like once upon a farm they could set up a dropdown that says, where are you located? And then you get an automated email that says, here’s the three nearest retail stores that have our product in them. Yeah. That could all be automated and very short.

Tyler: Yeah. So that was one surprise. Um, so there are other sales strategies, Amazon, right. So obviously a little smoother going through Amazon cause they’re subscription. Um, but the other two are definitely making a push on Amazon. Um, so the estimated sales number is based on jungle scout, which is the, the uh, plugin we use was, um, once upon a farm about 30,000 a month in sales and the serine kids about 15,000. So pretty, pretty decent.

RT: That’s great. Yeah. I mean, no problems there. It’s good money coming in. And I mean, the, the purchasing experience for serenity kids, that’s where I got it on Amazon was, was really easy. And the recommended products were just the other variety, you know, uh, options that you have. And it was, I guess the only thing I would change about it maybe is to have like a variety pack. Um, or something like that where I can get, you know, a two or three beef, two or three chicken. I’m sure that adds a lot of costs. So that’s probably why they’re not doing that. But, um, it seemed like either they were doing that or they’re thinking about doing that cause there was like a variety option on Amazon they couldn’t purchase. So I just think that, you know, from, from a customer feedback standpoint, I bet other people have that question.

Tyler: Cool. So let’s talk disruptive level. Yeah. So that’s why we do this, you know, so we can find these companies that are wrecking stuff and figure out how we can take that to their own businesses.

RT: So like what makes these disruptive? Well, for me, once upon a farm, the retail distribution strategy, this is not necessarily disruptive in terms of the entire world. Right. And it’s like, okay, what would you think to do when you started? Companies get into as many retailers as you can, but it’s, they’re crushing it. You know, especially compared to these brands, but other brands I’ve seen, I mean, they’re in every retailer I could find. And that’s really exciting for a small company like mine. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Tyler: I agree. Um, serenity, I mean, in terms of what they’re just, they have meat in a pouch. Yeah. That’s the most disruptive thing I’ve seen. It’s unbelievable. So I love that it’s a paleo focus brand. Um, so that’s incredibly disruptive and they’re, they’re doing a good job. Yup.

RT: And they’re clearly focused on nutrition and giving your kids the best thing in a pouch. Yep. And, and I think that is disruptive in itself is just doubling down on that. Yeah.

Tyler: Little spoon. Um, their subscription, you know, I mean, they’re there, it’s fresh as it can be. Zero preservatives, it’s coming to your house, you near get great quality. But I think the most disruptive thing is going to be the fact their subscription is being delivered, fresh food delivered to your house,

RT: and it’s once every two weeks, which I thought was interesting. And I, I bet they did that because that’s the shelf life. Um, but it’s kind of nice. I, in my opinion to only get a delivery every two weeks instead of every week. Yeah. You just less stress, you know, like how often does the package sit on the front porch for a couple of hours. You just, it’s once every two weeks. So those things you just think of a lot less.

Tyler: Yup. So over all three brands, disruptive in their own nature, but all three of them are doing something pretty special in this, in this space. Absolutely. Okay. So moving on, this is uh, this is the highlight, right? This is the beer scorecard. So this is what we do. What we do is everything we’ve talked about, um, we essentially wrap it up here and we each subjectively give our opinions about a certain categories. In the winter of the total is a person, the founder, we want to have the beer with the person. We’re going to track them down and it out. Try to buy him a beer. Yes. Okay. Here we go. So product design and packaging. Who wins?

RT: For me winter, my landslide is serenity kids. It’s just, it’s simple. It’s easy, simple colors. The packaging is just, it just works. Okay.

Tyler: I gave it to one spawn a farm. I love that, the modernness of this, but like the food aspect got me, you know, it just looks so fresh and every day I pick it up, every week we buy that whole foods, pick it up and I’m like, I feel good about it. So the refrigerated section, I feel good about it and that’s fair. Yup.

RT: Next is social strategy for me that was little spoon. I really liked just how they were using those pictures of kids in boxes and you know, really trying to be organic and authentic about their social media strategy and obviously posting pictures from their customers. Yeah, I agree. 100%.

Tyler:

Tyler: A little spoons. My favorite, I wanted to love a once upon a farm. It was just a little too boring for me. Hmm. Yeah. Do predictable. Well, they probably have to play the safeguard and that many retailers don’t make sense.

RT: Um, yeah. Next to sales and conversion, you know, website and all that stuff. For me it was once upon a farm. I think the fact that they’re in so many retailers, I mean when you look at the sales and distribution strategy, that’s the epitome of what you want for a mass market product like this. And I was just really impressed with how fast they’ve gotten into all those retailers and clearly making a fortune doing so.

Tyler: Yeah. Um, I agree. I mean they’re obviously doing the best, you know, across the board. Um, I think the, the com it has the biggest challenge will be little spoon. How to scale. You know, once you, your customer acquisitions cot, it’s tough because you got this customer acquisition costs fairly high. Maybe that kid wants, we, he hits, I don’t know, two years old or 15 months stops eating it. You’ve got to go out and get more customers. Yeah. You know, you can market to existing families with multiple kids, but like how do you scale beyond this? You know, you can’t go into retail, I don’t think, unless you start adding some things to your product. Um, so that’s the probably the biggest challenge right now, I think.

RT: Yeah. And subscription model is great, but it’s not like a gym membership where if you don’t go and you forget about it, it’s, you know, they keep charging your card. It’s like every two weeks another box is going to hit your doorstep. Yup. You’ll cancel it because you, you wasted for you. So they are the biggest hurdle. Um, I think so a disruptive level [inaudible] it takes the cake. For me it was little spoon. I just loved the fact that they are subscription. I love the fact that it’s every two weeks I feel like they’re doing subscription the right way. And that is disruptive in this industry because most people are doing what once upon a farm is doing. And like, like Gerber, they’ve been doing that for years and years and years and I think the subscription really takes the cake on that.

Tyler: Yeah. Serenity is, I gave it to, I mean they have meat in a packet. It’s fair. What did I say? The packet. Right. That’s awesome. Mike. Yeah. So the winner goes the once upon a form by like one point. Yeah. Just barely, I mean pretty close. But you know what that means.

RT: somehow we have to track down Jennifer Garner.

Tyler: Yep. So anybody knows her. We would have a beer with her or whatever she drinks, whatever you be like if she doesn’t drink water, coffee, whatever. Yeah. Drink when everybody drinks water.

RT: Yeah. So we can, we can do that. Yeah. I want to go to the farm.

RT: Yeah. Be awesome. That’d be pretty cool. We’re in Oklahoma, Oklahoma. Yeah. That’d be easy. Road trip. It’d be pretty sweet. Yeah. For us. Yeah. Well, yeah. So if you know Jennifer Garner and you can get us in touch with her, that’s the next person we need to interview. Yeah.

Tyler: And that person’s gonna get something special. They have that person jokes. Oh yeah. Oh yeah. What do my watch?

RT: Uh, sign up for that. Let’s do ho. Is that out there? Yeah, that’s out. You get a tick watch. $2,000 value. Wow. You connect us to Jennifer Garner can enact us. Solidifies. Yeah. It actually happens that you can’t just DMS her Instagram and be like, Hey, founder, that’s make it happen. Okay. Yeah. Cool.

Tyler: Okay. So our takeaways, like what do you take them back towards it?

RT: I the, the process of ordering all of these, I mean, I walked into the retail store, got these, went to Amazon, got these. And when I was on little spoons website, I got hit with the little Intercom thing in the bottom and it messaged me and said, Hey, if you have any questions, just type away. And I had a ton of questions. So I just started hitting him up and then it went to my phone and I could text them and email them. And it all went through that Intercom service. And I know there’s a lot of different, uh, things like Intercom, like messaging and text messaging for eCommerce companies, but there’s just kind of reminded me of like, I feel like it’s a missed opportunity that I’m not doing that for vortex. And I don’t know how many of my customers would actually use that service. And as the owner, if I’m getting all those texts and emails, like, I don’t know if that would be too much. Uh, but they had it figured out and, and the customer service was phenomenal.

Tyler: So that’s what I’m taking away is at least looking into that and what else I can do. That’s interesting. Okay. Um, my take away, I mean I think that uh, the retail strategy is something that, you know, as a sub, I own a supplement company, right? So eventually we’re going into retail. Yeah. Um, but I think the velocity that the retail helps build the brand is what I took away. I mean, if you look at how aggressively they went after retail first and exploded everything else, that’s something very interesting to kind of watch. Crazy. Awesome. Yeah. So that’s my takeaway.

RT: and that’s a wrap for the baby food episode of product’s worth talking about. We hope you enjoyed it and we hope you’ll subscribe to us right here on YouTube and you’ll check us out@productsworthtalkingabout.com on Instagram, Facebook, et cetera. If you have a cool product or idea, make sure you hit us up at products. We’re talking about.com. Fill out that contact form. Let us know, especially if we can eat it and drink it or drink it. We’re definitely in whiskey. Yeah.. Yup. We’re now in how color painters. Sometimes, you know, we are still at a standing desk, so that’s true. But either way, we’ll see you next time. [inaudible]

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